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Small grants program

The goal of the Alive & Thrive (A&T) Grants Program (2009 to 2014) was to identify new solutions for scaling up effective and sustainable interventions to improve infant and young child feeding by linking research to program delivery. A&T awarded eight two-year grants in 2010 and four in 2011. The Grants Program was managed by the University of California, Davis.

Summary

The 12 studies supported by Alive & Thrive took place in nine low-income countries: Bangladesh (2), Democratic Republic of Congo [DRC] (2), Haiti, Honduras, India, Kenya, Mexico, Nepal, Nigeria, and Viet Nam. Five studies integrated their interventions into pre-existing programs such as well-child clinic visits for check-ups and immunizations, home gardens and poultry production, and microcredit. Four studies used fortified complementary food products (micronutrient powders and small-quantity lipid-based nutrient supplements). Four studies used cell phones to provide breastfeeding support. Three studies retrained hospital staff in lactation management, and three studies provided breastfeeding support through group meetings. Other innovative intervention components included the use of radio to disseminate feeding messages, community breastfeeding knowledge contests for fathers, a complementary food cereal made from caterpillars, and hand sanitizers to prevent infection.

Profiles of studies. To learn more about a study, click on the study title. All study profiles include the study objectives, design, outcome measures, and interventions; major findings and their implications; and links to a presentation, journal abstract, and/or article.

Breastfeeding studies

Complementary feeding studies

Study outcomes:  The studies examined the impact of innovative interventions on a variety of infant and young child nutrition outcomes including breastfeeding (BF) knowledge, attitudes, and rates; complementary feeding knowledge, beliefs, and practices; morbidity; motor development; growth; and anemia or micronutrient status. Studies demonstrating statistically significant increases in early initiation of breastfeeding and exclusive breastfeeding rates, reductions in morbidity and anemia, and reductions in stunting or an increase in linear growth are shown in the table below.

X = intervention significantly associated with outcome, Empty cell = intervention not associated with outcome, NM = outcome not measured in study

Study

Increase in early initiation of breastfeeding

Increase in exclusive breastfeeding

Reduction in diarrhea

Reduction in anemia

Reduction in stunting or increase in linear growth

Training of traditional birth attendants (Bangladesh)

 X

      X

 NM

  NM

  NM

BF education campaign for fathers (Viet Nam)

   X

X

  NM

  NM

  NM

Baby-friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) retraining  + cell phone BF support (India)

  X

X

    NM

  NM

  NM

BFHI retraining of maternity hospital staff with or without BF flyer (DRC)

 

X

     X

(BFHI without flyer only)

  NM

  NM

BF education + cell phones + song or drama (Nigeria)

X

X

  NM

  NM

  NM

Cell phone breastfeeding support (Kenya)

 

X

  NM

  NM

  NM

Caterpillar cereal (DRC)

  NM

  NM

 NM

X

 

Homestead food production (Nepal)

  NM

  NM

X

 

 

Nutrition, health, hygiene education; hand sanitizers, micronutrient powders (Bangladesh)

  NM

  NM

 

  NM

X

Lipid-based nutrient supplement for 6 (but not 3) months (Haiti)

  NM

  NM

 

  NM

X

Small Grants Map